About your Search

20130117
20130125
STATION
LINKTV 4
CSPAN2 3
KQED (PBS) 2
WHUT (Howard University Television) 2
CNNW 1
KCSM (PBS) 1
KGO (ABC) 1
MSNBCW 1
WETA 1
WJZ (CBS) 1
LANGUAGE
English 19
Search Results 0 to 21 of about 22 (some duplicates have been removed)
on foreign policy. let's take a listen to what he did have to say. >> we will uphold our values through strength of arm and rule of law. we will show the courage to try to resolve our issues peacefully, not because we are naive about the dangers we face but because engagement can lift suspicion and fear. america will remain the anchor of strong alliances in every corner of the globe, and we will renew those institutions that extend our capacity to manage a crisis abroad, and no one has a greater stake in a peaceful world. >> we are joined by the director of the center at the atlantic council. thanks for being with us. we just heard the entire context of the mention of foreign policy. are you surprised how little was mentioned? >> not at all. this is the essence of foreign policy where we need to focus on domestic renewal. there were some bold initiatives in terms of rhetoric in the first year of the administration. we heard the cairo speech talking to the muslim world. we heard the prague speech, but the follow-up was a little bit tepid, so i think you will see more of the same, very fe
, do you differ in any areas in foreign policy with respect particularly with respect to former yugoslavia republican of mass done ya, and turkey, and care to comment about people in greece who are encouraging closer relations with israel some because they have fallen out with turkey? but i'd like to get some idea who how you view current foreign policy in greece. >> translator: i could tell you that -- is that a country doesn't have continue newty in the foreign policy. we going to come not to do a 180 and turn everything around, but able to give a multidimensional and active tone to our foreign policy. during my meeting with the u.s. ambassador, earlier this week, he told me what does it mean? what is multiidimensional and active foreign policy mean? greece is a country in europe but it's not like the other european countries. we're not lucky enough to be bordered by sweden. our borders are a hot bed. a hot area in the met mediterranean basin inspect is an area that is historically has been a region where there have been attempts to assert one's claims and make attempts associ
opens more than 200,000 jobs to women. >> ifill: then, we turn to u.s. foreign policy, as confirmation hearings begin for secretary of state nominee john kerry, two former national security advisers stephen hadley and zbigniew brzezinski weigh in. >> brown: paul solman looks at china's fast growing economy and asks, is it headed for a crash? >> wages are rising for the burgeoning middle class, but for hardscrabble factory workers: mounting protests against unlivable wages and working conditions. >> ifill: and vice president joe biden hangs out with hari sreenivasan on google plus to talk about gun violence. >> make your voices heard. this town listens when people rise up and speak. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broad
at the kerry nomination and foreign policy challenges he'll face, with two men who've served as national security adviser to the president. zbigniew brzezinski held that position with president carter. he's now a counselor at the center for strategic and international studies. stephen hadley served under president george w. bush. he's currently a senior adviser at the united states institute of peace. welcome to both of you. first, zbigniew brzezinski, your thoughts on john kerry as nominee for secretary of state? >> i think he's an absolutely top-notch choice. very good. experienced, solid, energetic with a broad vision and with a strong focus on trying to stabilize those parts of the world that are especially dangerous. i think he's practical, intelligent, well informed. >> brown: stephen hadley? >> he's in a way spent his whole life preparing for this job and it's good he did because he takes in the a very challenging time and i think he's going to have a lot of challenges before him. i think one of them is to prioritize where he's going to put his time. >> brown: well, you know, he s
the mainstay of british foreign policy for more than a century. yesterday, a member of the state department said that if britain were to leave the european union, that would seriously damage the special relationship between washington and london. >> thank you very much. >> to washington now where u.s. senator john kerry is president obama's choice for the next secretary of state. he has been quizzed by senators ahead of his recommendation. >> the issues like climate change and fighting disease are also priorities. he's expected to easily win approval for the job from the senate. to syria where authorities have called for a million-man prayer at mosques on friday in an effort to stem anti-regime demonstrations. >> the embattled president was also shown on state television praying with syria's spiritual leader to mark the birthday of the prophet mohammad. the fighting around damascus and other cities continues. a french woman who faced 60 years in a mexican jail on kidnapping charges is back in france. >> the 38-year-old was welcomed in paris by relatives and supporters. a mexican supreme cou
to u.s. foreign policy, as confirmation hearings begin for secretary of state nominee john kerry, two former national security advisers stephen hadley and zbigniew brzezinski weigh in. >> brown: paul solman looks at china's fast growing economy and asks, is it headed for a crash? >> wages are rising for the burgeoning middle class, but for hardscrabble factory workers: mounting protests against unlivable wages and working conditions. >> ifill: and vice president joe biden hangs out with hari sreenivasan on google plus to talk about gun violence. >> make your voices heard. this town listens when people rise up and speak. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour."
once, he barely mentions economic growth or the private sector. think about foreign policy. he doesn't mention terrorism, jihaddism. a decade of war is ending. has anyone told the jihadists in algeria or the taliban in afghanistan? he didn't mention afghanistan, he didn't mention iran. how many times in his first term did president obama try to establish his bona fides as a tough guy by saying he would not let iran get nuclear weapons? not a word about it and, indeed, almost the opposite, that engage empty's the way -- engagement's the way to handle problem abroad. jon: we are heirs to those who won the peace and not just the war who turned sworn enemies into the surest of friends. >> it really struck me. two things about it. first of all, we would not have won the peace of after world war ii if we hadn't win the wore. he got out of iraq, he's getting us out of afghanistan or, he seems not to want to confront jihadists or the iranian regime, so the idea you can win a peace without winning the war is delusional. but also that sentence, in particular he says they didn't just win the wa
woods, a co-director of foreign policy in focus at the institute for policy studies. welcome to "democracy now!" let's start off with the hostage situation in algeria. what do you understand at this point? >> first, i think we have to extend condolences to those families of those to a lost life. situation is fluid. hostages reportedly have been taken coming from at least eight different countries, including britain, japan, ireland. there are still reports that not only those that have been killed coming potentially from britain, france, japan and other countries, but also this is a crisis that is still under way. the algerian military is still seeing this as an ongoing incident. the information is scant t and fluid, changing very rapidly. it is coming out very slowly because of -- remember, algeria is essentially a military state. information is not flowing freely. there is a reluctance to share information with international actors, particularly former colonial powers, given the history of what has happened in algeria. >> the reports are coming out initially saying many of t
, yesterday the president didn't touch on foreign policy very much in his inauguration speech, but he did a little bit. i just wanted to play you a part of what he said. here's the president. >> we, the people, still believe that enduring security and lasting peace do not require perpetual war. our brave men and women in uniform tempered by the flames of battle are unmatched in skill and courage. our citizens, seared by the memory of those we have lost, know too well the price that is paid for liberty. the knowledge of their sacrifice will keep us forever vigilant against those who would do us harm. >> senator, obviously few would disagree with what he said there. it's pretty basic, eloquently said, as much of what he says is. but with three americans dead in a terror attack in 48 hours before he was speaking, would it have made sense to perhaps mention that? >> well, erin, i'm not going to parse with you exactly what the president said in his inaugural address. his second inaugural address. i will simply comment that i just returned on sunday from a visit to egypt, afghanistan, jordan, i
, the pivot eastward, if you will, when it comes to foreign policy. the pentagon is sounding the alarm over north korea's movement of some powerful missile launchers. what does this mean for stability in the renal as we look ahead? why some believe this may be a precursor to war. >>> also, the president as we just reported to you is officially sworn in for a second term in office. the big celebration is tomorrow. ahead, we'll look at inaugurations throughout our history. we'll be back with more happening now. ♪ [ slap! ] [ slap! slap! slap! slap! ] ow! ow! [ male announcer ] your favorite foods fighting you? fight back fast with tums. calcium-rich tums starts working so fast you'll forget you had heartburn. ♪ tum tum tum tum tums a. alright, another one just like that. right in the old bucket. good toss! see that's much better! that was good. you had your shoulder pointed, you kept your eyes on your target. let's do it again -- watch me. just like that one... [ male announcer ] the durability of the volkswagen passat. pa down something he will be grateful for. good arm. that's the power
a member of the appropriations committee speaks to the council on foreign relations on how foreign policy is affected by the budget and debt. that is at 830 eastern. and janet napolitano will focus on cybersecurity and immigration and terrorism and disaster relief. that will be at 9:30 p.m. on c-span3. on c-span, at 10:00 a.m. eastern, massachusetts senator john kerry testifies before the foreign relations committee. is it against the confirmation process for john kerry and secretary of state. he is scheduled to be introduced by secretary of state hillary clinton. >> this started in the 1940s with sylvia porter. and has been in the 1930s, the hard economic times of the 1930s. we see everything from alcoholics anonymous to napoleon thinking they can get rich and fascism and communism, and that was something that you can feel at the time. there is a cool thing going on at that time. and so we developed personal-finance out of this. sylvia's goal is to educate people so that the great depression will never happen again. but it is of its time. the idea that we can teach people certain skills
of collective action on issues like foreign policy and trade, and when we leave the door from the open to new members. a new settlement subject to the democratic legitimacy and accountability of national parliaments where member states combined in flexible cooperation, respecting national differences and not always trying to eliminate them, and in which we have proved that some powers can, in fact, be returned to member states. in other words, a settlement which would be entirely in keeping with the mission for an updated european union i have described today. more flexible, more adaptable, more open, fit for the challenges of the modern age. now, to those who say, and there are those who say it, that a new settlement can't be negotiated, i would say listen to the views of other parties in other european countries arguing for powers to flow back to european states. and also look to at what we've achieved already. we have ended the obligation for britain to bail out the eurozone members. we have kept britain out of the fiscal compact. we have launched a process which turns an existing justice
care of us. >> it happened so fast. >> around 30 foreigners remain unaccounted for, and there's been mounting criticism of the algerian authorities' information policies, but those who did escape unscathed praised the authorities. >> i was very impressed with the algerian army. >> very, very relieved. >> the international nature of the hostage crisis has raised concern the world over. in london, british prime minister david cameron postponed a much-awaited speech on europe to deal with the crisis. >> the algerian prime minister just told me this morning they are now looking at possible routes to resolve this crisis. >> with so many still unaccounted for and reports that some terrorists are still holed up in the installation, the wait continues for news from the remote gas field -- with so many insurgents dating back to a civil war with the country's -- when the country eradicate some of the most violent domestic groups. many -- >> many of the islamists are thought to be a new generation of foreign jihadists, hardened on the battlefields of iraq and afghanistan. >> they've been allowe
for britain itself because outside of europe it would be difficult. the german foreign minister says that berlin wants them to be an active member, but that cherry picking policies is not an option. the president of the european parliament said that the speech was one of the worst he had heard in a long time. that is just some of the reaction. a german member of the european parliament, we will be going to him in a moment. thank you for being with us here on "gmt." dr. fox, and you can see the problem, can you? you heard it from europe. there are not many people that david cameron can renegotiate with by the sounds of it. >> except for one thing, as a response to the eurozone crisis there will have to be a different relationship inside the european union. many countries want a different relationship from what currently exists. there is going to be changed. the status quo will not be an option. the idea of britain changing the dynamic is disingenuous, but there is going to be changed inside that relationship. we want the direction of travel to be different, a looser relationship. i ha
the controversial stop and frisk policy. >> number two, secretary of state, hillary clinton, is testifying before the senate foreign affairs committee right now. she told the panel she is committed to improving security at diplomatic missions wore wide after the deadly september raid in libya. three, we are following developing news from san francisco with crews mopping up from a fire in a large victorian building in san francisco overnight. investigators say the fire started outside the home before it spread inside. >> number four, we heard manti te'o's parents say share son was not a liar but he has reportedly admitted to lying about his girlfriend after finding out she did not really die or really exist. "good morning america" will have manti te'o's interview in a few minutes. >> enough fine, 49er fans have to work over serious money to go to the super bowl, online prices running from $2,000 for a regular ticket to $420,000, for a suite! the team held a lottery yesterday for a limited number of season ticket holders who have to pay $950 for each ticket which is face value. thank goodness for b
environmental extremism in the past and they will again. the conservative argument being these policies cost jobs, they make the u.s. less competitive against foreign markets. but you've got to wonder how big a fight, myra, are the republicans willing to get into on this? >> i thought it was a pretty aggressive speech from the president yesterday. his underlying premise in the speech was the economy's pretty much taken care of, i can move on to other issues like immigration, climate change and marriage. to his base, he's saying it's taken me four years to fix the economy. now i'm going to move on to some of your priorities. >> well, if that's what he's saying, is that how you heard it, margie? >> maybe i was watching a different channel. i saw a president who talked very specifically about openness and diversity and those are things that really we all share and it's certainly a lesson from this election and when you're talking specifically about climate change, a majority of americans say that they feel, this is according to gallup and pew, it's happening now, it's something that scientists
Search Results 0 to 21 of about 22 (some duplicates have been removed)

Terms of Use (10 Mar 2001)